When people text and drive, who’s on the other end?

| Jul 27, 2018 | Motor Vehicle Accidents

distracted driving, especially texting and driving, is a known dangerous behavior that causes serious and even fatal motor vehicle accidents, Georgia drivers continue to do it even in the face of stepped law enforcement efforts.

As a result, distracted driving has been blamed for the reason that, even though cars and roads have technologically speaking never been safer, the number of traffic-related fatalities has been climbing in recent years.

Some might wonder exactly with whom those who choose to text and drive are communicating, and the answer may be a bit surprising.

While there may be a common perception that a distracted driver is communicating with a drinking buddy or other friend, the reality is that most of them are texting a spouse, significant other or one of their children. In other words, they are communicating with those closest to them.

Many people also text their friends while behind the wheel, but relatively few people are texting professional contacts like bosses, subordinates and customers or other business colleagues. This is so even though many people think that texting and driving is necessary so as to be available at work.

Given that most people are communicating with their families when texting and driving, it makes more sense that, of the reasons people give for texting and driving, over 60 percent claim it is in order to avoid failing to respond to an emergency situation. When one’s family member is involved, even those things which, objectively, can be dealt with later may seem like emergencies.

Drivers therefore need to remind themselves that very few events are so urgent that they are worth putting themselves and their fellow motorists in serious danger. Moreover, it only takes a moment or two to pull over when there really is an emergency text.

In any event, people are still very attached to their phones, and so the hazard of texting and driving is not likely to diminish anytime soon. Those who have been injured by a distracted driver may have to be satisfied with the fact that they can hold such drivers financially accountable for their actions.